Archive for the Blog Category

Disqus

Posted in Blog, Cloud Computing, innovations, On-Line Advertising, Statistics, Stuff You Should Read/See, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on November 17, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

Are any of you using this site to bring extra traffic to your blog(s)?  What feedback have you received?

All following text copied from TechCrunch post:

“Now Over 200 Million Users A Month, Disqus Gets A New Look, Premium Add-Ons, New API

First, the numbers. The Disqus commenting system (which we use on TechCrunch) is now reaching over 200 million people a month, according to their Quantcast data. That means it took them only about 6 months to double traffic. And by that measurement, it makes them the fourth largest U.S. network, with over 95 million of those users based in this country. There are now 500,000 communities and websites using the service. And there are over 18 million profiles and over 160 million conversations across the network.

And so today it’s time for the next step. Currently rolling out across their network, the latest version of Disqus (technically, version 4) brings three key things: a new design/interface, premium add-ons, and a new API.

While many of the features users know and love about Disqus remain intact, the service has given a fresh coat of paint to some areas of the commenting system. The biggest changes here are in the deshboard area which admins and moderators use to control the comments on a site. Things have been cleaned up quite a bit, and the end result is a simplified moderation system. End users will also be able to more easily manage their own comments from here.

The bigger news is the availability of add-ons. It used to be that certain power features were only available to VIP members of the service that paid for it. These were mainly larger blogs (like this one) that needed and/or wanted more data about their comments through tools like analytics. Now Disqus is giving other sites access to these tools bundled together in smaller packages. For example, while VIP service costs $999 a month, you can pay $19 a month for the Plus service at get access to analytics, realtime updating, moderation reports, admin logs, and preferred support.

There is also a Professional package for $199 a month that adds a few things like single sign-on, an advanced theme editor, and partner API access.

Speaking of the API, with this version 4 roll-out, it has been completely redesigned from scratch. It’s still a bit of a work in progress, says co-founder Daniel Ha, but it should be more powerful. In fact, the new Disqus website is running off of it.

This new API will allow people to better integrate the service into mobile apps, allow them to write plug-ins, and eventually be able to even write their own frontend end for the commenting system. Here’s the link to the new API docs, and the new console.”

No correlation

Posted in Blog, Facebook, On-Line Advertising, Uncategorized, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on November 15, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

Remember Homework #7: well, there’s an official answer to the question: do more (Facebook) likes mean more votes?  And the answer is no no correlation:

My favorite quote:  “Trilogy says the Facebook margin of victory only explained about 13% of voting results. For gubernatorial races, that correlation is even lower, with the strength of a candidate’s Facebook presence only explaining about 0.8% of the vote margin. And for House races, there was actually a slight negative correlation, meaning a stronger Facebook popularity was associated with a smaller margin of victory.”

Paige’s Link

Posted in Blog, Open Source, Stuff You Should Read/See, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on November 10, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

Blog post from (our book’s author) Phil Simon, courtesy of Paige!

He writes:

I’m very pleased to be joining Mike 2.0 as a featured contributor. Considering that I’ve written two books, maintain my own blog, and write for a number of other technology sites and publications, it’s safe to say that I have no shortage of opinions on different technology, data, BI, and management issues–the very topics that Mike 2.0 addresses. In other words, based on what I have seen and continue to see as a consultant, it won’t be hard for me to write a weekly post that I hope you find interesting.

OK, enough with the introductions. This week I was reminded about the reasons that the future of open source software is so promising. To be sure, I’ve got OS religion.

So, why am I so bullish on OS? Well, many reasons that will become apparent as you read my posts each week. Allow me to start off with a story from this past week….

(read more at the article)

HW#7 Help

Posted in Blog, Homework, Social Networking, Uncategorized, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on November 7, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

Social media, the Web and mobile phones have transformed American politics. This PBS MediaShift special series explores the technologies, the issues, and the resulting sweeping effects. See the full series of articles here: http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2010/10/special-series-politicalshift-2010298.html

Shutdown “FAIL”

Posted in Blog, Facebook, Homework, Social Networking, Stuff You Should Read/See, Twitter, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on September 16, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/09/16/harrisburg2

From the article: ” The Harrisburg University of Science and Technology made waves last week when it announced it would block access to Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, and AOL Instant Messenger from its campus wireless network for one week. The idea was to make students, faculty, and staff reflect on the role social media plays in their lives.   Several days into the “shutdown,” the college’s inability to keep students away from social media is showing.  It was a bold ambition to begin with. Nationwide, 92 percent of students log into Facebook and spend an average of 147 minutes there per week, according to the Student Monitor. Harrisburg will not have a firm idea of how many students actually abstained from using Facebook and other blocked sites until it does exit surveys and focus groups. But Eric Darr, the provost behind the plan, says that based on his own anecdotal observations, the proportion of students who are actually going cold turkey is probably around 10 or 15 percent.

Meanwhile, some students have gone to great lengths to foil the university’s attempts to block them from accessing the sites on campus. Darr says he talked to three who hiked three blocks to log into Facebook from the lobby of a nearby hotel. Some particularly tech-savvy students have tried hacking the campus network to get around the block administrators put in place on Monday, says Charles Palmer, director of the university’s Center for Advanced Learning and Entertainment Technologies.

Still, the provost says that even if only a slim percentage of students actually renounce Facebook and Twitter for the week, the project will have been a success, if only because of the conversations it has started. The university never expected full abstinence from students, Darr says, nor was it trying to conduct a scientific experiment. “This extreme media coverage in and of itself is forcing more focus on social media,” he says, noting that he had just gotten off an interview with a radio talk show based in Seattle. “That was the whole point of this in the first place,” he says.

The proposed moratorium, originally reported last week by Inside Higher Ed, spread to some unlikely reaches, including a Latvian news site and NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.” In his monologue on Monday, Fallon quipped that students assigned to write about the experience might title their essays, “We all have smartphones, dumbass.”

Not all, but some. “The blackout isn’t really that bad,” says Noel Stark, a junior at Harrisburg. “Anyone with a 3G phone can still view these sites on campus.” A number of faculty have also availed themselves of this workaround, says Palmer.

Then there is the fact, omitted from much of the media coverage (including Inside Higher Ed’s), that Harrisburg is nonresidential. Many students live nearby, but not under the umbrella of the campus wireless network. This means that while the college can try to prevent students from accessing social media sites in class, it cannot make students honor the spirit of the project once they get home. And it appears most students are not.

This is not to say the project has failed to inspire reflection. “Direct social interaction (aka the old fashioned face-to-face kind) seems to be increasing this week based on observation,” writes Rene D. Massengale in an e-mail. Massengale, an associate professor of biotechnology, says he has had thoughtful discussions about the project in his class. He says it has affected his interactions outside the classroom as well. “Sometimes I see a student I know with their head out of their PDA or computer, and I have to resist the urge to go introduce myself,” he says. “‘Hi, I’m Dr. Massengale — you know, that person who teaches your class.’”

Students in Harrisburg’s degree programs are required to have laptops, and, perhaps more than at many other colleges, students have their computers open in class. (“We are a paperless school,” says Mehdi Noorbaksh, coordinator of general education at the university.)  “It turns out that a number of them were on Facebook or chatting online,” says Palmer, the educational technologist. “We had one student who said, ‘I guess now I’ll have to pay attention in class.’ ”  “Some like it, some don’t,” says Gio Acosta, a junior. “Some say they’re getting [more] work done; some of them say, ‘I need my Facebook!’ ”

Acosta says he has been feeling the itch himself. Since being blocked from accessing the site on his laptop during class, Acosta has noticed an impulse to browse Facebook every 10 minutes or so. “I don’t know if that’s because it’s restricted, or because it’s part of me right now,” Acosta says.

He says he misses unwinding with Facebook between classes, when he does not have to be following a lecture but is still beholden to the proscriptions of the campus network. And Acosta has found it hard to keep track of his friends like he is used to, since most of them, remarkably, are more responsive to Facebook than to text messages. But while he is in class, the computer and information sciences major says, being barred from Facebook has helped him focus.  Once he gets home at night, though, Acosta says he makes sure to scratch that digital itch. “It’s fair game at home,” he says. “They didn’t make any rules about that.”

Blogging is the story in Obama Comments

Posted in Blog with tags , , , , on April 16, 2008 by Kay & Project Management

From NY TImes: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/14/us/politics/14web-seelye.html?ex=1366084800&en=172c83e6b4dffed2&ei=5124&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

Blogger Is Surprised by Uproar Over Obama Story, but Not Bitter
Published: April 14, 2008
“The back story of how Senator Barack Obama’s comments about small-town voters became news is getting almost as much attention in the blogosphere as the comments themselves…her experience raises questions about whether the roles, rules and expectations for journalists and bloggers are different. Can a person be both?”