Archive for the Stuff You Should Read/See Category

Syria Restores Access to Facebook and YouTube

Posted in Facebook, innovations, Social Networking, Stuff You Should Read/See, Twitter, YouTube on February 10, 2011 by Kay & Project Management

According to the NYTimes, Syria has restored Facebook and YouTube.  Now that Egyptian President Murbarak has resigned, it will be interesting to study the role of social media, and Web 2.0 technology in the 2011 revolutions.

From the article: “The Syrian government began allowing its citizens Wednesday to openly use Facebook and YouTube, three years after blocking access to Facebook and other sites as part of a crackdown on political activism. Human rights advocates greeted the news guardedly, warning that the government might have lifted the ban to more closely monitor people and activity on social networking sites….”

There’s a great quote from the Secretary of State camp: ” “We welcome any positive steps taken to create a more open Internet, but absent the freedoms of expression and association, citizens should understand the risks,” said Alec J. Ross, senior adviser for innovation to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who helped organize a delegation of business leaders from technology companies to meet with Mr. Assad in Syria last year. In those meetings, the business leaders said that opening the Web would be important to drive innovation.”

Controversy for Final Class of Spring 2011

Posted in Stuff You Should Read/See on December 9, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

BBC: What is Wikileaks?

Ted Talk: Julilan Assange

Wikileaks

Should college students read Wikileaks?  (CNN Story)

Anonymous “Operation Payback”

BBC on Anonymous

Amazon’s Sale (IRONIC)

Disqus

Posted in Blog, Cloud Computing, innovations, On-Line Advertising, Statistics, Stuff You Should Read/See, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on November 17, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

Are any of you using this site to bring extra traffic to your blog(s)?  What feedback have you received?

All following text copied from TechCrunch post:

“Now Over 200 Million Users A Month, Disqus Gets A New Look, Premium Add-Ons, New API

First, the numbers. The Disqus commenting system (which we use on TechCrunch) is now reaching over 200 million people a month, according to their Quantcast data. That means it took them only about 6 months to double traffic. And by that measurement, it makes them the fourth largest U.S. network, with over 95 million of those users based in this country. There are now 500,000 communities and websites using the service. And there are over 18 million profiles and over 160 million conversations across the network.

And so today it’s time for the next step. Currently rolling out across their network, the latest version of Disqus (technically, version 4) brings three key things: a new design/interface, premium add-ons, and a new API.

While many of the features users know and love about Disqus remain intact, the service has given a fresh coat of paint to some areas of the commenting system. The biggest changes here are in the deshboard area which admins and moderators use to control the comments on a site. Things have been cleaned up quite a bit, and the end result is a simplified moderation system. End users will also be able to more easily manage their own comments from here.

The bigger news is the availability of add-ons. It used to be that certain power features were only available to VIP members of the service that paid for it. These were mainly larger blogs (like this one) that needed and/or wanted more data about their comments through tools like analytics. Now Disqus is giving other sites access to these tools bundled together in smaller packages. For example, while VIP service costs $999 a month, you can pay $19 a month for the Plus service at get access to analytics, realtime updating, moderation reports, admin logs, and preferred support.

There is also a Professional package for $199 a month that adds a few things like single sign-on, an advanced theme editor, and partner API access.

Speaking of the API, with this version 4 roll-out, it has been completely redesigned from scratch. It’s still a bit of a work in progress, says co-founder Daniel Ha, but it should be more powerful. In fact, the new Disqus website is running off of it.

This new API will allow people to better integrate the service into mobile apps, allow them to write plug-ins, and eventually be able to even write their own frontend end for the commenting system. Here’s the link to the new API docs, and the new console.”

SaaS Examples

Posted in Cloud Computing, Presentations, Stuff You Should Read/See, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on November 15, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

http://www.quora.com/What-are-some-examples-of-successful-self-service-SaaS-model-startups (the replies to the post are most helpful)

What are some examples of successful, self-service SaaS-model startups?

Classic SaaS businesses leverage a salesforce to close deals and rely on CLTV + CAC as primary metrics. Self-service SaaS is a similar model, with some big differences – no sales team, super low cost of customer acquisition, payback period on a customer is usually very quick. Both have a subscription model, but in self-service, there’s very little human interaction with customers.

Note that many “freemium” businesses also use this model, but it’s not just freemium, as many of these will have a single sale or advertising as a revenue model vs. the subscription to a web-based software service.

Some examples I’m aware of include:

http://www.wufoo.com – online forms for small business
http://www.surveymonkey.com – web surveys for businesses of all sizes
http://www.ancestry.com – consumer focused genealogy research site
http://www.seomoz.org – my company, focused on SEO tools & resources for search marketing professionals

Response:

Rand Fishkin, CEO & Co-Founder, SEOmoz

Bummed that there’s so few answers, but I’ve found a few more I’ll add to the pile:

Davide Di Cillo,   Designer & entrepreneur – http://davidedicillo.com

 

Facebook Super-logoff

Posted in Facebook, Intellectual Propery, Privacy, Social Networking, Stuff You Should Read/See, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on November 15, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

New Facebook privacy tip: ‘Super-logoff’

John D. Sutter
By John D. Sutter, CNN
November 12, 2010 6:30 p.m. EST | Filed under: Social Media

(CNN) — If clamping down the privacy settings on your Facebook page isn’t enough to help you sleep at night, take a cue from the youth of America.

Try the “super-logoff.”

Performing the trick doesn’t take superhuman powers. Instead of just closing a browser window or clicking the “log off” button at the top right of the Facebook homepage, some young, privacy-concerned users are simply deactivating their Facebook accounts each time they leave the site.

Then they reactivate their accounts to log back on.

Why go to all this trouble?

Well, for one, it’s not hard. Facebook makes it notoriously difficult to fully “delete” an account. But “deactivating” an account is easy — it only takes a single click, and deactivated Facebook users maintain all of their friend connections, wall posts, photos and the like. The upside, for the privacy paranoid, is that when a “deactivated” user isn’t on Facebook, no one else can see their profile, post on their wall or tag them in photos.

For privacy-minded people, it’s a soothing alternative. It gives them ultimate control.

Read more at article

Facebook e-mail?

Posted in Facebook, Stuff You Should Read/See, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on November 15, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

Submitted by Paige (and Ross mentioned it in class):

http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/Investing/top-stocks/blog.aspx?post=40a56973-d7f1-46fe-a771-7794986485e8

Coming Monday: Facebook’s Gmail killer?

If rumors are true, the social media icon is looking to launch a Web-based e-mail client.

Posted by InvestorPlace Friday, November 12, 2010 11:27:19 AM

e-mail © Digital Vision If you think you’re already addicted to Facebook, be prepared to spend more time on your social media page.

TechCrunch.com reports that Facebook has sent out invitations to a special event Monday. Many people predict Facebook’s previously secret Project Titan, a Web-based e-mail client run through Facebook, will be unveiled.
Within the company, the project has been referred to as the “Gmail killer.”

Paige’s Link

Posted in Blog, Open Source, Stuff You Should Read/See, Web & Enterprise 2.0 on November 10, 2010 by Kay & Project Management

Blog post from (our book’s author) Phil Simon, courtesy of Paige!

He writes:

I’m very pleased to be joining Mike 2.0 as a featured contributor. Considering that I’ve written two books, maintain my own blog, and write for a number of other technology sites and publications, it’s safe to say that I have no shortage of opinions on different technology, data, BI, and management issues–the very topics that Mike 2.0 addresses. In other words, based on what I have seen and continue to see as a consultant, it won’t be hard for me to write a weekly post that I hope you find interesting.

OK, enough with the introductions. This week I was reminded about the reasons that the future of open source software is so promising. To be sure, I’ve got OS religion.

So, why am I so bullish on OS? Well, many reasons that will become apparent as you read my posts each week. Allow me to start off with a story from this past week….

(read more at the article)